An Interview With George Manby!

January 13, 2018

We chatted with George about what it is like to be an artist and about sharing art in the digital age.

Follow George on Instagram to see even more of his art.


DISSOLVING FILM: When did you first realize that you wanted to be an artist?

GEORGE MANBY: There's no defining moment, in any career of this nature, as far as I know- but I suppose I couldn't see myself doing anything but working in the creative industry along with like minded people. Whether it be animation or film. I suppose if I can turn my pastime and my favourite part of my day into something that can make people that stumble upon my work happy, and earn me a living then I must get better! And do just that.

Where do you draw inspiration from?

I always ask myself this question, as it's a useful thing to know personally, so that I can be more inspired and pro-active. I would say above all by a massive amount music, other things like films, going round exhibitions, always seem to kick something into action in my imagination if you will.

If you have a process, can you elaborate on it?

I don't believe I have a process, or a route to take in that case. However, I've found the things I see as the most successful, and usually the processes I enjoy the most, are just inspired by something, for example "The Oil" by Hans Zimmer as the song that has inspired me enormously, led me to picture something I could animate and from that, my short film I'm currently drawing came.

How have you seen your style develop as an artist?

As I'm so young and new to this whole world of 'art' I haven't really developed as an artist usually would've, all I can say is I used to draw as a child as a form of entertainment, I was encouraged by teachers and friends to keep drawing, and as of the past year or so, I've grown eager to try more mediums. And now I'm here! In the last year of school but ready to move into art as a full time student.

What is your favorite and least favorite part about sharing your art with so many people?

I've only really been showing the things I make as of recently because of a positive reaction from the people around me, I of course really love hearing the people I care about and look up to tell me they enjoyed something I made. However, drawing will always be something I do for me, like hobbies are for most people, it's just something I do and it's a positive that people also like to see it.

Do you think being a young artist makes people look at your work differently?

Perhaps? I'd assume my peers know I have a lot to learn. As I do, but it's nice to see people double my age really getting involved with me.


Interview by Zoë Bridgwater and Zoey Martinez

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